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  • Writer's pictureGrant Ongstad

How to Write a Blog Intro That Doesn't Lose Your Readers

No one actually reads your blog content.


And it’s not for the reasons you might think.

  • It’s not because of the content subject

  • It’s not a reflection of your writing skills

  • It’s not your argument

It’s the intro!


So if you want to learn how to craft a compelling intro that keeps your readers scrolling down the page, here are 8 simple techniques you can start using today.


Let’s dive in.


#1. Understand the Purpose of an Intro


What is the purpose of an intro?


If you were to ask college me, I’d say something like


“It’s to summarize what I’m going to talk about," Or “It’s to clearly state my thesis! “


…And that’s the reason the only people who read my papers were my professors (if that).


No, the real purpose of an intro is to compel someone to read the rest.


So, wherever you’re writing an intro, think will this make someone want to keep reading?



#2 Keep It Short


People don't like reading. The only reason they've landed on your blog post is that they expect they'll get some value out of it. That's why your intro needs to get right to the point.


Prolific SEO writer and entrepreneur Brian Dean recommends intros be 4-8 sentences, max.


Here is one of his most popular blogs, which receive millions of views a month.


I've never seen an Intro I thought was too short. The goal is to keep the reader scrolling down the page.


#3. Understand the Purpose of an Intro


What is the purpose of the intro?


If you were to ask college me, I’d say something like


“It’s to summarize what I’m going to talk about.”

Or


“It’s to clearly state my thesis! “

…And that’s the reason the only people who read my papers were my professors (if that).


No, the real purpose of an intro is to compel someone to read the rest.


So, wherever you’re writing an intro, think will this make someone want to keep reading?


# 4. Start with a genuine question


There’s some psychological magic that happens when you ask someone a question. It flips the script from a one way lecture to a conversation.


A 2019 study by Harvard found that asking questions increases likability. We are naturally interested in people who are interested in us.


Your question should be thought provoking and relevant to your target reader.


Neil Patel is one of the most popular marketing experts in the world. He uses questions all the time.







#5. Start With a Statistic


Posts that start with a statistic are 600% more likely to earn you a customer. That’s a lie, obviously. But you get the point.


Statistics are effective because they’re objective. It’s a way to let data do the talking, so you don’t need to.


It’s another form of social proof.


The key is that the statistic has to be relevant and compelling.


Relevant - the statistic should fit or support your argument.


Compelling- It should be impressive enough to grab the reader’s attention. They should want to learn more.


Here are two examples


“70% of people are interested in buying a new car”

Notice how the statistic is very general. Of course, most people would like to buy a new car.


Compare that to:


“75% of car sales are made during the first lot visit”

This one is relevant to a car salesman. It has a direct implication to her job. Plus it’s compelling - it might make someone want to learn more.


# 6. Use the PPP Framework


The PPP formula stands for Preview, Proof, Preview. It’s inspired by a copywriting framework known as the 4 P’s.


Preview - talk directly about what the post contains. Give a preview of what the post will be about.


Proof - provide proof that you know what you’re talking about, or how they’ll benefit from reading.


Preview - give another preview of what is to come.



Here is an example of PPP at work.


“In this post, I’m going to show you exactly how to save up to 10 hours a week by eliminating meaningless tasks.
This is the same technique I’ve used to help hundreds of entrepreneurs scale their business
So, here are 5 actionable ways you can increase productivity today.”

# 7. Do Something Different


If you read enough blog posts, they all start sounding similar. Great writers accept that they aren’t writing for everyone. They take chances.


Check out the following sentences.


“Exercising daily can increase longevity”

“How much longer do you want to live?”

Which one is more compelling? Everyone knows that exercising can contribute to good health and longevity, but someone who is actually concerned about their declining health will be moved along better by the second one.


#8. Include Social Proof


Social proof is how you answer the question, “why should I listen to you?”.


You can provide social proof by providing testimonials, results, reviews, or simply bringing up that you have years of experience.


You can include social proof in an intro with just one sentence.


For example, check out the following intros.


“Getting in shape doesn’t have to consume your life. I’ve helped hundreds of people reclaim their health by helping them make small lifestyle changes.”


Here’s another one from Brian Dean:




#9. Sound More Confident by Eliminating Filler Words


Most bloggers use filler words that weaken their argument.


These are words like “maybe”, “possibly”, “might”, “really”, “may”


Consider these two similar intros.


“Are you losing productivity across your sales teams? This may be because they’re spending too much time scheduling meetings. Scheduling meetings can be time-consuming for most people.
Our software might help make it a little easier and can make it quicker to schedule meetings with clients”

Vs.


“Losing sales productivity? You need to take the administrative work off your plate. Scheduling meetings is a total time suck.
Our software lets you easily schedule meetings. Fast.”

Authoritative writing doesn’t beat around the bush. So eliminate the words that don’t add value.


Conclusion


And that’s it! The next time you’re struggling with an intro, try out a few of these techniques.


Want more tips? Subscribe to my email newsletter.





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